Tag Archives: netscaler

Automated configuration of NetScaler Loadbalancer for Kubernetes, Mesos and Docker Swarm

There are an incredible number of Cluster Managers for containerized workloads. The top clustered container managers include Google’s Kubernetes, the Marathon framework on Apache Mesos and Docker Swarm. While these managers offer powerful scheduling and autonomic capabilities, integration with external load balancers is often left as an exercise for the user. Since load balancers are essential components in a horizontally-scaled microservice this omission can impede the roll-out of your chosen container manager. Further, since a microservice architecture demands rapid deployment, any solution has to be able to keep up with the changes in the topology and structure of the microservice.

Citrix NetScaler is an application delivery controller widely used in load balancing applications at several Web-scale companies. This blog post describes Nitrox, a containerized application that can work with Docker Swarm or Kubernetes or Marathon (on Apache Mesos) to automatically reconfigure a Citrix NetScaler instance in response to application events such as deployment, rolling upgrades and auto/manual scale.

The figure below shows a scaling event that causes the number of backend containers for application α to grow from 4 to 6. The endpoints of the additional containers have to be provisioned into the NetScaler as a result.

scaleout

All cluster managers offer an event stream of application lifecycle events. In this case, Docker Swarm sends a container start event; Marathon sends a status_update_event with a taskStatus field and Kubernetes sends an endpoint update event. The job of Nitrox is to listen to these event streams and react to the events. In most cases this fires a query back to the cluster manager to obtain the new list of endpoints. This list of endpoints is then configured into NetScaler.

nitrox

The reconfiguration of Netscaler is idempotent and complete: if the endpoint already exists in the Netscaler configuration, it isn’t re-done. This prevents unnecessary reconfiguration. The set of endpoints sent to Netscaler is not-incremental: the entire set is sent. This overcomes any problem with missed / dropped events and causes the Netscaler configuration to be eventually consistent.

Another choice made was to let the application / NetScaler admin provision the frontend details of the application. The front-end has myriad options such as lbmethod, persistence and stickiness. It is likely that each application has different needs for this configuration; also it is assumed to be chosen once and not dependent on size and scope of the backends.

You can find Nitrox  code and instructions here. The container is available on Docker Hub as chiradeeptest/nitrox. The containerized Nitrox can be scheduled like a regular workload on each of the container managers: docker run on Docker Swarm, an app on Marathon and a replication controller on Kubernetes.

Implementation Notes

Kubernetes ( and optionally: Docker Swarm) requires virtual networking (Kubernetes is usually  used with flannel). Therefore the container endpoints are endpoints on a virtual network. Since the NetScaler doesn’t participate in the virtual network (consider a non-virtualized NetScaler), this becomes a problem. For Docker Swarm, Nitrox assumes that bridged networking is used.

For Kubernetes, it is assumed that the service (app) being load balanced is configured to use NodePort style of exposing the service to external access. Kubernetes chooses a random port and exposes this port on every node in the cluster. Each node has a proxy that can provide access on this port. The proxy load balances the ingress traffic to each backend pod (container). One strategy then would be to simply configure the NetScaler to load balance to every node in the cluster. However, even if there are say 2 containers in the application but there are 50 nodes, then the Netscaler would needlessly send the traffic to many nodes. To make this more efficient, Nitrox figures out the list of nodes that the containers are actually running on and provisions these endpoints on the NetScaler.

 

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