CloudStack Basic Networking : frictionless infrastructure

Continuing on my series exploring CloudStack’s Basic Zone:

Back to Basics

Basic Networking deep dive

The origin of the term ‘Basic’ lies in the elimination of switch and router configuration (primarily VLANs) that trips up many private cloud implementations. When the cloud operator creates a Basic Zone, she is asked to add Pods to the availability zone. Pods are containers for hypervisor hosts. sg_groups_pptx6

The figure above shows a section of a largish Basic Zone. The cloud operator has chosen to map each Rack to one Pod in CloudStack. Two Pods (Rack 1 and Rack 24) are shown with a sample of hypervisor hosts. VMs in three security groups are shown. As described in the previous post, the Pod subnets are defined by the cloud operator when she configures the Pods in CloudStack. The cloud user cannot chose the Pod (or subnet) when deploying a VM.

The firewalls shown in each host reflect the fact that the security group rules are enforced in the hypervisor firewall and not on any centralized or in-line appliance. CloudStack orchestrates the configuration of these firewalls (essentially iptables rules) every time a VM state changes or a security group is reconfigured using the user API.

Each Rack can have multiple uplinks to the L3 core. In fact this is the way data centers are architected for cloud and big data workloads. In a modern datacenter, the racks form the leafs and the L3 core consist of multiple spine routers. Each host has multiple network paths to every other host — at equal cost. CloudStack’s Basic Zone takes advantage of this any-to-any east-to-west bandwidth availability by not constraining the placement of VMs by networking location (although such a facility [placement groups] is available in CloudStack).

networking_in_the_cloud_age_lisa2013_pptx

The cloud operator can still use VLANs for the rack-local links. For example, access VLAN 100 can be used in each  rack to connect to the hypervisors (the “guest network”), while the untagged interface (the “management network”) can be used to connect to the management interface of each hypervisor.

CloudStack automatically instantiates a virtual DHCP appliance (“virtual router”) in every Pod that serves DHCP and DNS to the VMs in the pod. The same appliance also serves as the userdata server and password change service. No guest traffic flows through the appliance. All traffic between VMs goes entirely over the physical infrastructure (leaf and spine routers). No network virtualization overhead is incurred. Broadcast storms, STP configurations, VLANs — all the traditional bugbears of a datacenter network are virtually eliminated.

When the physical layer of the datacenter network is architected right, Basic Zone provides tremendous scale and ease-of-use:

  1. Location-independent high bandwidth between any pair of VMs
  2. Elimination of expensive bandwidth sucking, latency-inducing security appliances
  3. Easy security configuration by end-users
  4. Elimination of VLAN-configuration friction
  5. Proven scale : tens of thousands of hypervisors
  6. Egress firewalls provide security for the legacy / non-cloud portions of the datacenter.
  7. The ideal architecture for your micro-services based applications, without the network virtualization overhead
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2 thoughts on “CloudStack Basic Networking : frictionless infrastructure

  1. Pingback: How to manage a million firewalls – part 1 | Cloudier Than Thou

  2. Pingback: CloudStack Basic Networking : deeper dive | Cloudier Than Thou

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